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Branchial Cleft Abnormalities

What is a branchial cleft abnormality?

A branchial cleft abnormality is a mass of abnormally formed tissues within the neck. These tissues may form pockets called cysts that contain fluid, or they may form passages that drain to an opening in the skin surface. Branchial cleft abnormalities are usually located near the front edge of the sternocleidomastoid muscle, which is the neck muscle that extends from the jawbone (mastoid) to the clavicle (collarbone) and sternum (breastbone). Different types of branchial cleft abnormalities include the following:

Branchial cysts are more common in older adolescents and adults, especially males, while branchial fistulas are more commonly seen in young infants.

What causes a branchial cleft abnormality?

A branchial cleft abnormality is a congenital (present from birth) defect that occurs during early embryonic development when the structures and tissues that form the neck and throat do not properly grow together. The tissues form pockets and pathways that contain cells from other parts of the neck and throat. Branchial cleft cysts are lined with skin and lymph cells and contain fluid that is secreted by these cells. Branchial cleft fistulas also contain skin cells but drain mucus and fluids from other internal areas of the neck and throat.

What are the symptoms of a branchial cleft abnormality?

Branchial cleft abnormalities are usually small, but can enlarge enough to cause difficulty swallowing and breathing. The following are the most common symptoms of a branchial cleft abnormality. However, each child may experience symptoms differently. Symptoms may include:

The symptoms of a branchial cleft abnormality may resemble other neck abnormalities or medical problems. Always consult your child's physician for a diagnosis.

How is a branchial cleft abnormality diagnosed?

Branchial cleft abnormalities are diagnosed by physical examination. Generally, the specific location of the mass or the fistula opening on the skin can help in the diagnosis. A branchial cleft cyst may not be noticed unless it becomes infected and is painful. The skin opening of a branchial cleft fistula drains mucus, and often pulls back into the skin with swallowing movement.

In addition to a complete medical history and physical examination, diagnostic procedures for a branchial cleft abnormality may include the following:

Treatment of a branchial cleft abnormality:

Specific treatment of a branchial cleft abnormality will be determined by your child's physician based on:

Treatment may include surgery to remove the mass. A small percentage of branchial cysts may regrow.

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