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Third-Degree Burns

What is a third-degree burn?

A third-degree burn is referred to as a full thickness burn. This type of burn destroys the outer layer of skin (epidermis) and the entire layer beneath (or dermis).

Anatomy of the skin
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What causes a third-degree burn?

In most cases, third-degree burns are caused by the following:

What are the symptoms of a third-degree burn?

The following are the most common symptoms of a third-degree burn. However, each child may experience symptoms differently. Symptoms may include:

Large third-degree burns heal slowly and poorly without medical attention. Because the epidermis and hair follicles are destroyed, new skin will not grow.

The symptoms of a third-degree burn may resemble other conditions or medical problems. Consult your child's physician for a diagnosis.

Treatment for third-degree burns:

Specific treatment for a third-degree burn will be determined by your child's physician, based on the following:

Treatment for third-degree burns will depend on the severity of the burn. Burn severity is determined by the amount of body surface area that has been affected. The burn severity will be determined by your child's physician. Treatment for third-degree burns may include the following:

What is a skin graft?

A skin graft is a piece of the child's unburned skin which is surgically removed to cover a burned area. Skin grafts can be thin or thick. Skin grafts are performed in the operating room. The burn that is covered with a skin graft is called a graft site.

What is a donor site?

The area where the piece of unburned skin was taken to be donated to a burned area is called a donor site. After a skin graft procedure the donor sites look like a scraped or a skinned knee. Your child's physician will decide if a skin graft is needed. A skin graft is often performed after debridement or removal of the dead skin and tissue.

Graft site care:

The dressing is left on the graft site for two to five days before it is changed, so that the new skin will stay in place. For the first several days, graft sites need to be kept very still and protected from rubbing or pressure.

Donor site care:

The donor site is covered for the first one to two weeks. The site needs to be kept covered. Donor sites usually heal in 10 to 14 days. If a dressing is applied, it usually remains on until it comes off by itself. Lotion is applied to the donor site after the dressing comes off. This skin often flakes off and looks dry.

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