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Chronic Hypertension

What is chronic hypertension?

Blood pressure is the force of the blood pushing against the artery walls. Each time the heart beats, it is pumping blood into these arteries - resulting in the highest blood pressure when the heart contracts and is pumping the blood. High blood pressure, or hypertension, directly increases the risk of coronary heart disease (heart attack) and stroke (brain attack). Hypertension is defined in an adult as a blood pressure:

When a woman has pre-existing hypertension or develops hypertension before the 20th week of pregnancy, this is called chronic hypertension. Less than 3 percent of women have this condition.

Other forms of hypertension in pregnancy include pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), also known as toxemia or preeclampsia. Some women with chronic hypertension also develop PIH, resulting in a potentially serious condition.

How does pregnancy affect chronic hypertension?

Most risks are not increased for most women with mild chronic hypertension if there are no other complications. However, if hypertension is severe, if there are other conditions such as diabetes, or if PIH develops along with chronic hypertension, risks are much greater for mother and baby.

Risks of severe chronic hypertension in pregnancy may include, but are not limited to, the following:

Risks to the fetus and newborn depend on the severity of the disease and may include, but are not limited to, the following:

Management of chronic hypertension during pregnancy:

Prenatal care and careful monitoring of blood pressure and other factors are important. Women with high blood pressure often need to continue taking their antihypertensive medication. Your physician may switch you to a safer antihypertensive medication during pregnancy.

Laboratory tests may be performed on a regular basis to check the levels of various blood and urine substances related to hypertension. Other tests to monitor heart and kidney function may also be performed. Fetal testing may begin in the second trimester and may include:

Click here to view the
Online Resources of High-Risk Pregnancy


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