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Enlarged Adenoids

Enlarged Adenoids

Often, tonsils and adenoids are surgically removed at the same time. Although you can see the tonsils at the back of the throat, adenoids aren't directly visible.

Sometimes. the doctor may need to see the size of the adenoids. This can be done by checking them with an X-ray or by using a tiny telescope to look into the back of the nose where the adenoids sit.

So, what are adenoids anyway? They're a patch of tissue that sits at the very back of the nasal passage. The adenoids help to stop bacteria and viruses from entering the body through the nose.

adenoidal hypertrophy illustration

In kids, adenoids usually begin to shrink after about 5 years of age and often practically disappear by the teen years.

Symptoms of Enlarged Adenoids

Because adenoids trap germs that enter the body, adenoid tissue can temporarily swell as it tries to fight off an infection. These symptoms are often associated with enlarged adenoids:

If enlarged adenoids are suspected, the doctor may ask about and then check your child's ears, nose, and throat, and feel the neck along the jaw. To get a really close look, the doctor might order one or more X-rays. For a suspected infection, the doctor may prescribe oral antibiotics.

When Is Surgery Necessary?

If enlarged or infected adenoids keep bothering your child and are not controlled by medication, the doctor may recommend surgically removing them with an adenoidectomy. This may be recommended if your child has one or more of the following:

Having your child's adenoids removed is especially important when repeated infections lead to sinus and ear infections. Badly swollen adenoids can interfere with the ability of the middle ear space to stay ventilated. This can sometimes lead to infections or middle ear fluid causing a temporary hearing loss. So kids whose infected adenoids cause frequent earaches and fluid buildup might also need an adenoidectomy at the time of their ear tube surgery.

And although adenoids can be taken out without the tonsils, if your child is having tonsil problems, they may be removed at the same time. A tonsillectomy with an adenoidectomy is a common pediatric operation.

What Happens During Surgery

Surgery, no matter how common or simple the procedure, can be frightening for both kids and parents. You can help prepare your child for surgery by talking about what to expect. During the adenoidectomy:

Your child will wake up in the recovery area. In most cases, a child can go home the same day as the procedure. Some children may need to stay overnight for observation.

The typical recuperation after an adenoidectomy often involves several days of moderate pain and discomfort.

In less than a week after surgery, everything should return to normal and the problems caused by the adenoids should be gone. The adenoid area will heal naturally, which means there are no stitches to worry about. There's a small chance any tissue that's left behind can swell, but it rarely causes new problems.

Reviewed by: Steven P. Cook, MD
Date reviewed: May 2013

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Note: All information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.
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