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Posted February 17, 2014
Congratulations to the 2013 Patient Safety Star Winners for All Children’s Hospital

Sheila Castle & Kathy Renn 
Sheila Castle and Kathy Renn

Congratulations to Sheila Castle and Kathy Renn, All Children's recipients of the Johns Hopkins Medicine Patient Safety Stars award.  Sheila and Kathy were selected by the Patient Safety Coaches for their diligence in maintaining a safe culture for patients and families at All Children's Hospital.  As the ACH winners, they are now candidates for the Johns Hopkins Medicine award. The winner for the system award will be announced at the Johns Hopkins 5th Annual Patient Safety Summit in Baltimore in June. 

"Our commitment to patient safety is very important," said Brigitta Mueller, MD, MHCM, ACH Chief Patient Safety Officer and Vice President of Medical Affairs. "We appreciate the efforts of these two Patient Safety Stars along with our entire staff who are working together to help make our hospital as safe as possible."

Sheila is currently an RN in the Perioperative area and was part of a team effort that prevented a patient from receiving an unnecessary surgical procedure.    

After admitting the patient and reviewing the history and physical and medical records, she noted that the patient was scheduled for a surgery at the same site of the surgery done in 2005. She worked with the nurse practitioner in preoperative surgery; both waited on obtaining the consent.  Sheila notified the surgeon of her concern and alerted the OR staff of the situation. The patient and chart were reviewed by the surgeon. The surgeon met with family and surgery was cancelled thanks to her critical thinking and follow through.

Kathy is currently a clinical education specialist for Patient Safety and Quality but was in the role of CVICU Case Manager for this nomination.

Kathy designed an at-home program for a Spanish-speaking family who could not read or write Spanish or English. Their child had a complex congenital heart disease which required home equipment needs and multiple medication needs.  She not only spent the time to create a home med schedule (complete with a moon and a sun to signify day/night meds), but also went above and beyond to color code each medication and its appropriate syringe and a color coded table for the family to refer to. She alerted outlying pharmacies, closed every loop to ensure the patient would receive every medication on time and supplied the pharmacy with the color coded table and colored tape for future refills. Kathy worked with the healthcare team to help adjust the frequency so that the family would only have to administer medications twice daily. A translator helped the family until they were comfortable.